Tuesday, September 10, 2013

British Heavy Mortar platoon

In this post I will show some pictures of my British Heavy Mortar platoon for Flames of War. I tried some new techniques and recipes compared to the first two stands I painted a few weeks ago. I have a new recipe for painting flesh and painted the webbing and helmet scrim slightly differently. I have two mortars, the observer, and command stand painted and so have enough for a short platoon to game with. I'm pleased with the results of the latest two stands. I just need to refine a few small things and work on my neatness on the last two stands and the rifle platoon...

These models are from Battlefront's BR726 blister. I have a bit of a love hate relationship with this set. The casting is a bit rough in a few places. I am getting bored already of painting the same four poses for the crew. I'm going to substitute in a few rifles in the last two stands.


I've been trying to take my infantry painting to the "next level". I'd like to have an army that can compete for best painted at some tournaments. There are some really skillful painters locally and at bigger tournaments. I added eyes and the badges as some of those extra little touches. I didn't like the first few eyes I did but I am coming to like them on the models with the new face painting method. You don't notice them on the table really but they add some detail when you look at them closely.

I am hoping this platoon will be pretty effective in games. My tanks struggle with dug in infantry. These should help to make infantry spread out more and may even knock off a few stands.

I based them in the same manner as my paratrooper platoon. They are supposed to be in a field at the start of Operation Market Garden. The fields are generic enough that they will look good in Normandy games too. The sandbags and prepared positions are built using greenstuff, balsa wood, and resin pumice. I have all of the pictures for a short basing tutorial. Check back for it later this week.


As I mentioned in the introduction, I tried a few new recipes for the newest stands. I painted the webbing and bags with a new recipe. I based it in Vallejo Model Colour Green Grey, washed with Devlan Mud (or equivalent), block painted VMC Green Grey and then highlighted with Reaper Master Series Pale Olive (just what I had, white mixed with Green Grey would be fine too).
Previous method on the left, new method on the right.
I also used a new recipe for the flesh. I based it with Vallejo Game Colour (VGC) Tan, washed with Devlan Mud, and then successively highlighted Tan, 50:50 Tan:VGC Dwarf Flesh, Dwarf Flesh, 50:50 Dwarf Flesh:Reaper Pale skin, Reaper pale skin, Reaper pale skin highlight. I didn't realize how many layers that was until I wrote it out. 8 layers I think. Then some stubble on some models using a mix of German Grey and the Dwarf Flesh: Pale skin mix. I paint the eyes after the wash at the start so I can easily correct/repaint them. After painting the first layers the highlights go very quickly. I think it took me around an hour to paint the skin on 7 models.

Old left, new right. I think the flesh on the right looks more lifelike and has more contrast on the tabletop.
Aim that way.

I'm tangled in my phone cord!


See anything good?


Thanks for visiting. Check back later this week and I will have a basing tutorial up. Next in the painting queue: 2 paratrooper stands, 3 tank commanders, universal carriers, and the last 2 mortar stands. Which to do next? Comments and constructive criticism are appreciated as always!

9 comments:

  1. Amazing job. Faces are impressive and I think the little touches like the unit badges and the extra markings on the Mortar shells really help the models stand out.

    Highlighting on the uniforms and pouches is great too... very envious hoping my Canadians can come close

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    1. Thanks. I'm a bit jealous of the nicer uniform colours of the Canadians. It took me a long time to be happy with how the British uniforms look painted.

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  2. Your painting is looking awesome Cam. Your making your 15mm guys look like 28s!!!

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    Replies
    1. Haha. Thanks. I think the skin on my 15mm guys is looking better than any human skin I have done on 28mm models. I want to go back and paint some more 28mm now that I have learned so much at this smaller scale. The extreme highlights are a bit cartoony but they pop more than more realistically highlighted models.

      You managing to get any painting or gaming in? You look pretty busy in the pictures you post on facebook.

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  3. New skin technique looks great - a massive improvement on the old.

    This quality painting would win our tournament painting award for sure - your area must have some talented painters for sure!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Dai. I like the depth on the new skin too. There are some very good painters here. One guy is featured in one of the Art of War books. Another guy I play with has incredible detail over his whole company.

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  4. Beautiful! And yes, the newer skin really pops as being more lifelike: well done! The shells are great too.

    Personally, I love the 'drabness' of the British uniforms and vehicles.

    Partly it's becaause (from my - more simpplistic) perspective, it makes them pretty straightforward to paint, but more than that it's epitomised by a photo in the FoW main rulebook of some Germans surrendering to British soldiers: the Germans look so damned spiffy in their well-cut, sharply designed uniforms, and the Tommies just look slovenly in utterly shapeless drab.

    You just look at it and think, 'How on Earth did they ever lose?'.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks! I like the new skin too.

      There is that side to it. Very plain and British.

      Did you know Hugo Boss designed the german uniforms? They were cut in a way to make the soldiers look larger (the high waists).

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