Monday, October 20, 2014

Hedge rows

This weekend I found a few spare minutes to finish some hedge rows for my Flames of War scenery. The hedges are made out of scrub pads, PVC foam board, sand, paint, and flock. They were easy to make and feel very durable so far. I used the excellent hedge making tutorial over at The Demo Gamers to build the hedges. Be sure to check out their blog for some great tutorials and ideas for demonstration games.



I struggle to get good pictures on the gaming table. Anyone have any tips for taking good pictures? I had my daylight bulbs overhead today but they just made everything look shiny and washed out.
The set of hedges built so far has a total length of about 7 feet. That sounds like a lot, but it doesn't go very far once they are built into rectangles. I'm hoping to build another 12 feet or so and to add some more T and cross intersection pieces to add some different shapes. The hedges are the height of a 15mm medium tank (or conveniently, exactly the height of a 251/1 half-track...). I'm trying to build up my collection of linear terrain as I would really like to do a small Normandy campaign sometime in the next year.


I built these as hedges and not bocage as I find the bocage rules are extremely challenging for tank armies. It is very historical but I find that tanks are totally crippled by needing skill checks to get anywhere and especially if they have to assault over bocage (which they invariably do). For this reason, I built these as hedges. Lots of hedges are still pretty tough for tanks as some of their greatest assets (speed and being able to do damage at a distance, the classic Cromwell conundrum) are mitigated by lots of linear terrain. I'm also planning to build in gaps and open gates to allow for more movement through hedged areas. I dislike games where an entire infantry army hides in a single hedged area and is totally protected from shooting before the enemy assaults the hedges. I'd love to hear some other ideas in the comments about how to have lots of linear terrain and hedges without overly favouring infantry armies.

The hedges are built from foamed PVC (doesn't warp), scrubby cleaner pads, hot glue, flock, and white glue. And a smattering of decorative tufts and things on the bases to add some interest. They were pretty quick to make and will hopefully be quite durable with the thick coat of PVA glue holding the flock on. I also matte varnished them to help hold the flock and grass in place.


I actually used the KV-1 and Tiger 1 in a Mid-War game today. They didn't do anything except get blown up but at least they looked pretty doing it.


Thanks for visiting!

10 comments:

  1. Nice classic hedges :)
    I've still got a packet of scourers in my terrain making supplies to make some for Warhammer.

    RE; lighting, I think much like when using daylight bulbs in a light-box, you may need something like greaseproof/parchment paper in front of the lamps to diffuse the light slightly.

    But taping it over the lamps may be too dangerous due to the heat, you'd have to use your imagination on setting that up.

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    1. Thanks Stygianheart. With my lightbox I don't use any diffusers. I tried paper in front of the lights before but it caught on fire. Maybe some of those photography umbrellas....

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  2. Hedges are on my list of things to do. So much cheaper than buying resin efforts too.

    Plus, my current German project will need something to hide behind!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Dai. I much prefer these to resin items too. Too expensive and breakable. These do make nice cover to hide behind :-)

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  3. lol I just realized that this my favourite blog is Canadian!!!

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    Replies
    1. Haha. Glad you like it! Where are you from?

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  4. Great looking hedges, and very nice photos!

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