Sunday, December 6, 2015

Tutorial: Stug step-by-step Painting

In today's post I am going to share some pictures of a recently completed Open Fire Stug for Flames of War. I made a short tutorial for this model using twitter. In this post I will share the step by step painting of this model in a series of tweets. I'll add some more detail to each section as we go along.

This model is from the Open Fire set. I painted it up as a Firestorm troop for Turn 2 of the Firestorm: Caen campaign. This Stug was painted to match the other one I painted back in 2013. My painting has changed since then. The other Stug was one of the first German models I painted. Many of the core concepts have remained the same. The models match well enough for basic tabletop use.

The finished model.
I haven't done a Step-by-step (or tweet-by-tweet) tutorial of an entire model before. The pictures are a bit rough and it is lacking detail but it will give an overview of how I go about painting my German tanks. This model was painted in around 2 hours to complete it for the campaign game the next day. 

First I assembled the model. No issues here. I like this simplified model. It isn't as detailed as the newer plastic Stugs.
I painted color modulation on the Stug. I primed it with the Vallejo Surface Primer Dunkelgelb colour and worked up from there as in this tutorial on Dunkelgelb color modulation..

Next I added camouflage green stripes by airbrusing Vallejo Model Air Russian Green in a line pattern. I thinned it and used a low pressure to avoid overspray.
Next I basecoated the details. Charred brown on wooden tools, VMA Gun on metal, Black on black parts. VMA Tank Brown on tracks and then a drybrush of VMA gun.Chipping with a dark brown colour sponged on. Edge highlights and highlights on chips done with a mix of Iraqui Sand and VMA Sand.
Dom's Decals for the decals. Just a symbol and the number. Nice and simple. Brushed on some gloss varnish before the decal to avoid silvering. I think I highlighted the wooden tools here too and added a grey edge highlight to the wheels on the back of the engine deck.
I airbrushed some gloss varnish. Once it was dry I did a pin wash with AK Interactive Enamel Brown Wash for Green Vehicles. I washed tracks, recesses, and the road wheels. Added a little soot to the barrel using a Tamiya Model Master weathering set.
I used some turpentine and q-tips to clean up the wash. I carefully removed it where it was too thick and messy. Once it was dry I varnished with Testor's Dull Cote. I used it at this step in the game.
I added a MIG filter for tritonal camouflage to darken the tank and blend the highlights in. Put it on a big brush, sponged some off, and ran it over the tank a few times. I washed the tracks and road wheels with AK Interactive Earth enamel wash. Once it was dry I used my Tamiya weathering compact to add more dust and rubbed some off the highest edges with my finger. A final matte varnish and it is done.

Finally, I photographed it. :-)


I hope you enjoyed this little tutorial. I know that some of these steps are not very self-explanatory as there are different methods to applying the paints at each step. I hope that seeing the process is helpful. I know myself, that I often am unsure how a final model will look while painting it. It is always nice to see other people's work and how a model looks at early stages.


For more work in progress pictures, game recaps, and campaign updates you can follow me on twitter @RustandtheCity or by going to https://twitter.com/RustAndTheCity.

Please let me know in the comments if there are specific sections you would like me to do individual tutorials on. I have more Stugs to paint and I can definitely add more tutorials on different parts. Is there interest in a tutorial on chipping? Tracks? Adding streaks? Dust? Please post the tutorials that would be helpful to you in the comments below.

Thanks for visiting!

15 comments:

  1. Looks great! I'm curious about your use of the filter, you use it after doing a pin wash? I've always used it before.

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    1. Thanks Richard. When I do it varies a bit. I did it at the end here because I had to wait for it to dry. I often do it at the end as well so I can match the other finished models.

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    2. Gotcha. Great idea about using it to make newer models match older ones!

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  2. Wowzers. That's amazing!

    What colours do you do the metal of the tracks?

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    1. Thanks Drax. Thank tracks are Vallejo model air tank brown (dark reddish brown), drybrushing of Vallejo model air gun metal, and then washed with am interactive earth effects enamel wash.

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    2. I have pictures for a separate track tutorial. Just need to edit them and write it...

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  3. I think at this scale any more details would be lost. Looks fab as is though. Very nicely done mate!

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    1. Thanks Dai. I agree. I could add more stowage and things but I am pleased with the painting detail level. The new plastic models have crisper detail rather than more detail.

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  4. Love these tutorials. Been using them on 28's for Bolt Action.

    Was there a particular name for the Mig filters?

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    1. I think it is the filter for Tritonal camouflage.

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  5. Ah. Found it now. Thought "filter for tritonal camouflage" sounded really long winded for a paint color, but by god that's what it says in the bottle.

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    1. Haha, yes, a little long winded but very specific.

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  6. I don't get the dusting phase. How is it looks like dusted even after varnish?>

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